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For background let’s review Luke’s mention of the Roman ruler in chapter 2

Luke 2:1-note Now in those days a decree went out from Caesar Augustus,...
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For background let’s review Luke’s mention of the Roman ruler in chapter 2    Luke 2:1-note  Now in those days a decree went out from Caesar Augustus, that a census be taken of all the inhabited earth.    COMMENT: Caesar Augustus (Caius Octavius, grand-nephew, adopted son, and primary heir to Julius Caesar who died in 44 BC) was the founder of the Roman Principate and considered the first Roman emperor. Before and after Julius’ death in 44 B.C., the Roman government was constantly torn by power struggles. Octavius (Caesar Augustus) ascended to undisputed supremacy in 31 B.C. by defeating his last remaining rival, Antony, in a military battle at Actium. In 29 B.C., the Roman senate declared Octavius (Caesar Augustus) Rome’s first emperor. Two years later (27 BC) they honoured him with the title “Augustus” (“exalted one”—a term signifying religious veneration). Rome’s republican government was effectively abolished, and Augustus (Caesar Augustus) was given supreme military power. Caesar Augustus reigned over the Roman Empire from 27 BC until his death at age 76 in AD 14. He was succeeded by Tiberius Caesar who his adopted son (Lk 2:1) and he reigned from A.D. 14-37.    Under the rule of Caesar Augustus, the Roman Empire dominated the Mediterranean region (see the map of Roman domination under Caesar Augustus), ushering in a period of great prosperity and relative peace (the Pax Romana). Caesar Augustus ordered a census of “all the inhabited earth” (Lk 2:1-note), that is the world of the Roman Empire. This census decree actually established a cycle of enrollments that were to occur every 14 years. Palestine had previously been excluded from the Roman census, because Jews were exempt from serving in the Roman army, and the census was designed primarily to register young men for military service (as well as account for all Roman citizens). This new, universal census was ostensibly to number each nation by family and tribe (hence Joseph, a Judean, had to return to his ancestral home to register—see Lk 2:3-note). Property and income values were not recorded in this registration, but later the statistics gathered in this census were used for levying poll taxes (Mt 22:17 – the annual fee of one denarius per person). The Jews came to regard the census itself as a distasteful symbol of Roman oppression because the funds were used to finance the occupying armies. However, the poll tax was the most hated of all because it suggested that Rome owned even the people, while they viewed themselves and their nation as possessions of God. Another reason the Jews may have hated this tax was because of what the coin itself symbolized to the Romans. On one side of the silver denarius was a profile of Tiberius Caesar, with the Latin inscription “Tiberius Caesar, son of the divine Augustus” around the coin’s perimeter. On the opposite side was a picture of the Roman goddess of peace, Pax, with the Latin inscription “High Priest.”Shalom MarciaDisciples Of Truth – Israel – USA  – UKhttp://www.disciplesoftruth.net
Jaakko I do enjoy getting these in email! Very indepth. Shalom my sister!!! 1 hour 21 minutes ago
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Marcia (Proverbs 3:5-6) Shalom Brother Jaakko!! Thanks to Jerry and Gods word 28 minutes ago
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Luke Chapter Three.

Darrell Bock – Luke 3:1–20 contains much uniquely Lucan material. Only Luke details the content of John the Baptist’s teaching (Luke...
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Luke Chapter Three.Darrell Bock – Luke 3:1–20 contains much uniquely Lucan material. Only Luke details the content of John the Baptist’s teaching (Luke 3:10–14). Only Luke cites Isa. 40:4–5 (Luke 3:4–6). The lengthened citation (Matthew and Mark cite only Isa. 40:3) means that Jesus’ coming offers the opportunity of salvation for all. Only Luke mentions the imprisonment of John so early in the account (Luke 3:19–20). But there are also traditional materials that have clear parallels elsewhere. The warning about judgment to the Jewish leaders has a clear parallel (Luke 3:7–9; Matt. 3:7–10). The promise of the Mightier One to come has conceptual parallels (Luke 3:15–17; Matt. 3:11–12; Mark 1:7–8). Both old and fresh material describe John’s ministry of preparation….This pericope (Lk 3:1-6) has a twofold purpose: to place Jesus’ ministry in the midst of world history (Lk 3:1–2a) and to set the ministry of John the Baptist in the midst of OT hope (Lk 3:4–6). The word of God comes to John in the wilderness as his ministry renews God’s direct activity for people (Lk 3:2b–3). By beginning in the wilderness, the account picks up where the infancy section left off with John (Lk 1:80). (Baker Exegetical Commentary).Henry Burton eloquently introduces Luke 3 with these comments…   WHEN the Old Testament closed, prophecy had thrown upon the screen of the future the shadows of two persons, cast in heavenly light. Sketched in outline rather than in detail, still their personalities were sufficiently distinct to attract the gaze and hopes of the intervening centuries; while their differing, though related missions were clearly recognized. One was the Coming ONE, who should bring the “consolation” of Israel (Luke 2:25-note), and who should Himself be that Consolation; and gathering into one august title all such glittering epithets as Star (Nu 24:17), Shiloh (Ge 49:10-note), and Emmanuel (Isaiah 7:14-note), prophecy reverently saluted Him as “the Lord,” paying Him prospective homage and adoration. The other was to be the herald of another Dispensation, proclaiming the new King, running before the royal chariot, even as Elijah ran from Ahab to the ivory palace at Jezreel, his Voice then dying away in silence, as he himself passes out of sight behind the throne. Such were the two figures that prophecy, in a series of dissolving views, had thrown forward from the Old into the New Testament; and such was the signal honor accorded to the Baptist, that while many of the Old Testament characters appear as reflections in the New, his is the only human shadow thrown back from the New into the Old. (Expositor’s Bible Commentary).ShalomMarciaDisciples Of Truth – Israel – USA  – UKhttp://www.disciplesoftruth.net
Marcia (Proverbs 3:5-6) added a photo to Stream Photos album in Commentaries and Sermons group 4 days ago

Luke Commentary Completion of Chaper Two

Kent Hughes – It was under Augustus’ rule that decisive strides were taken
toward making the Caesars gods. In...
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Luke Commentary Completion of Chaper TwoKent Hughes – It was under Augustus’ rule that decisive strides were takentoward making the Caesars gods. In fact, at about the same time Luke waswriting these words, some of the Greek cities in Asia Minor adopted Caesar’sbirthday, September 23, as the first day of the New Year, hailing him as“savior.” An inscription at Halicarnassus (birthplace of the famousHerodotus) even called him “savior of the whole world.” Historian JohnBuchan records that when Caesar Augustus died, men actually “comfortedthemselves, reflecting that Augustus was a god, and that gods do not die.”So the world had at its helm a self-proclaimed, widely accepted god andsavior. Luke, the historian and theologian, wants us to see this as thetableau for understanding the coming of the real Savior. The contrast couldnot be greater. Inside Rome, in the Forum, the doors of the Temple of Warhad been closed for ten years and would remain closed for thirty more. Tomemorialize the peace, the famous monument Ara Pacis Augustae propagandizing Augustus’ peace had been erected. Rome and Augustus had bludgeonedevery foe into submission. There was “peace,” but it was a dark peace—aHitler’s peace—and no man or woman or boy or girl could say a word againstit without fearfully looking over their shoulder….The baby Mary carriedwas not a Caesar, a man who would become a god, but a far greater wonder—thetrue God who had become a man! (Preaching the Word – Luke, Volume I: ThatYou May Know the Truth)Census be taken (583) (apographo from apo = from + grapho = to write))  isused here literally of citizens enrolled or registered, e.g., as occurred inan official registration in tax lists. Also used in Luke 2:3, Luke 2:5 andonce in Heb 12:23. Agographo is translated in the NAS: census be taken(1),enrolled(1), register(1), register for the census(1). Caesar had a census onearth but God has a more important census in heaven the writer of HebrewsrecordingBut you have come to Mount Zion and to the city of the living God, theheavenly Jerusalem, and to myriads of angels, 23 to the general assembly andchurch of the firstborn who are enrolled (perfect tense = speaks of pastcompleted action with ongoing effect or result. In past when we believed wewere in a sense “enrolled” and our enrollment will endure forever and everamen!) in heaven, and to God, the Judge of all, and to the spirits of [the]righteous made perfect, (Heb. 12:22-23-note)INHABITED EARTH: oikoumene ~ the inhabited earth when it has a politicalreference in the NT, speaks of the Roman Empire or the Roman world. Such adecree does not reflect ignorance on the emperor’s part, but arrogance. Asgreat as the Roman empire was, he certainly knew that Rome could not gathertaxes beyond its own boundaries. He did believe, however, that the ratherlimited part of the “world” (“inhabited world”) which was controlled by Romewas all that deserved the designation. Thus is the pride of so many rulersof empires!Who stands out in this huge census?  Jesus.Darrell Bock – Luke portrays Augustus as the unknowing agent of God, whosedecree leads to the fulfillment of the promised rise of a special ruler fromBethlehem (Mic. 5:1–2 [4:14–5:1 MT]). In the period of the emperor known forhis reign of peace, God raises up the child of peace. For many interpreters,Luke is not only placing Jesus’ birth in the context of world history, buthe also is making a play on the theme of the peaceful emperor (Schürmann1969: 102; Fitzmyer 1981: 393–94; R. Brown 1977: 415–16). The real emperorof peace is Jesus, not Octavian. But in the absence of Lucan comment aboutAugustus, the point, if present, is subtle. In addition to the historicalconnection, the mention of the census explains how a couple from Nazarethgave birth to a child in Bethlehem. The accidental events of history havebecome acts of destiny. Little actions have great significance, for theruler was to come out of Bethlehem and only a governmental decree puts theparents in the right place.  (BECNT – Luke)Note that there are NO “accidental events” in the history of the world!Indeed, “history” is “HIS STORY! ShalomMarciaDisciples Of Truth – Israel – USA  – UKhttp://www.disciplesoftruth.net
Marcia (Proverbs 3:5-6) added a photo to Stream Photos album in Commentaries and Sermons group 5 days ago

Book Of Luke Commentary Chapter Two Part Five.

The reign of the Roman Emperor Caesar Augustus was a time of relative peace
on earth (the Pax Romana) and...
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Book Of Luke Commentary Chapter Two Part Five.The reign of the Roman Emperor Caesar Augustus was a time of relative peaceon earth (the Pax Romana) and is one aspect of the “fullness of time” ofwhich Paul spoke in Galatians 4:4-note writing “But when the fullness of thetime came, God (Notice Who is in control of TIME! Our God is sovereign!)sent forth His Son, born of a woman, born under the Law.”  This “time wasfull” because several events converged by God’s providential working: (1).Roman civilization had brought peace and a road system (2). Greciancivilization provided a language–the lingua franca (3). Jews proclaimedmonotheism and messianic hope in the synagogues of the Mediterranean world.There was a remnant of Jewish men and women who anticipated the time was athand and who were actively “looking for redemption in Jerusalem” (forexample, godly Simeon was “looking for the consolation of Israel” – Lu2:25-note). Sadly most of the “chosen people” did not recognize the fullnessof time as explained by Jesus Himself in Luke 19:44 when He declared “you(Jews) did not recognize the time (kairos) of your visitation (epskope – seeword study – what a word picture! Verb form used by Mary in Lk 1:78 – shewas “looking” for the Messiah!).” If they had read and interpreted literallythe prophecy of Daniel they would have recognized Messiah the Prince (see Da9:24-note; Da 9:25-note; Da 9:26-note; Da 9:27-note).Wiersbe – Augustus Caesar was ruling, but God was in charge, for He usedCaesar’s edict to move Mary and Joseph eighty miles from Nazareth toBethlehem to fulfill His Word. Rome took a census every fourteen years forboth military and tax purposes, and each Jewish male had to return to thecity of his fathers to record his name, occupation, property, and family.When Mary said “Be it unto me according to Thy word” (Luke 1:38), it meantthat from then on, her life would be a part of the fulfillment of divineprophecy. God had promised that the Saviour would be a human, not an angel(Gen. 3:15; Heb. 2:16), and a Jew, not a Gentile (Gen. 12:1-3; Num. 24:17).He would be from the tribe of Judah (Gen. 49:10), and the family of David (2Sam. 7:1-17), born of a virgin (Isa. 7:14) in Bethlehem,’ the city of David(Micah 5:2).All of this occurred just as the Scriptures said, and Caesarunknowingly played an important part. A.T. Pierson used to say, “History isHis story,” and President James A. Garfield called history “the unrolledscroll of prophecy.” If God’s Word controls our lives, then the events ofhistory only help us fulfill the will of God. “I am watching over My word toperform it,” promises the Lord (Jer. 1:12, NASB) (The Bible ExpositionCommentary)Caesar Augustus –  (Latin: Imperātor Caesar Dīvī Fīlius Augustus 23September 63 BC–19 August 14 AD) was the founder of the Roman Principate andconsidered the first Emperor, controlling the Roman Empire from 27 BC untilhis death in AD 14.ShalomMarciaDisciples Of Truth – Israel – USA  – UKhttp://www.disciplesoftruth.net
Gavriella Amen, amen, 5 days ago
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Marcia (Proverbs 3:5-6) added a photo to Stream Photos album in Commentaries and Sermons group 6 days ago

He brought in the amazing Pax Romana, the Roman Peace which was often
called the Pax Augusta in tribute to this man. He literally, not only...
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He brought in the amazing Pax Romana, the Roman Peace which was oftencalled the Pax Augusta in tribute to this man. He literally, not onlyconquered the world, as it were, but he brought peace to all that realm bythe skill that he had as a leader.  This Roman Peace literally made softborders everywhere. Then he built massive Roman roads and effectivetransportation systems in all directions for the extent of this great powerof Rome in the world. And what it did was it facilitated the easy spread,the rapid spread of the gospel of Jesus Christ. It was perfect timing.Galatians 4:4 says, “In the fullness of time God sent His Son.” One of theelements of the fullness of time was into a world where you had the mostrapid, easy access to take the gospel everywhere.  And because Romecontrolled it all, there were no borders. There were no points to stop.There was fluidity and facility and the Gospel spread rapidly largely alongRoman roads and Roman trade routes by sea and by land. The Pax Romanabrought an unheard of period of peace at the hand of this great leader. In14 A.D. he died and was succeeded by Caesar Tiberius, a familiar name toanybody who studies the New Testament because Tiberius, taking the throne in14 A D was the Caesar through the latter life and ministry of Jesus Christ.He is the Caesar that we read about in the Gospels during the ministry ofJesus Christ….Now in the year 27 B.C., three years after Octavius began his rule, theRoman Senate gave him the title Augustus, which means majestic one, highlyhonored one…august one could mean holy one. It was a term reserved for thegods.  It was used to refer to the gods and always referred to the godsbefore this man but now it was being used to refer to him because he wasviewed as if he were a god. Then it began to be used for Julius Caesar, whohimself had wanted to be treated as a god.  So it was after that 27 B.C.titling of Caesar Augustus that the idea that the caesar was a god tookroot. (Jesus’ Birth in Bethlehem – Part 1)Decree (1378)(dogma from dokéo = to think) refers to a fixed andauthoritative decision or requirement (see the “decree” [dogma] of theemperors in Lu 2:1, Acts 17:7 = “the decrees of Caesar”).Caesar (2541)(kaisar – of Latin origin) refers to the emperor of Rome. Itwas originally a surname of Julius Caesar, later taken as a title by thechief Roman ruler.Gilbrant on kaisar – The proper noun Kaisar is the Greek transliteration ofthe Latin word Caesar. “Caesar” was originally the family name of GaiusJulius Caesar. Julius Caesar was the final leader of the Roman Republic. Hewas assassinated on March 15, 44 B.C., by opponents in the Roman Senate whowere concerned that he had amassed too much power. In his testament he hadadopted his nephew Octavian, who assumed not only the name “Caesar” but alsothe military support and ultimately the political power previously held byJulius Caesar. By the year 27 B.C. Octavian had gained for himself theRepublic’s ancient sacral title “Augustus” and was officially known asImperator Caesar divi filius Augustus (“the Emperor Caesar Augustus, sacredson of god”). Caesar Augustus, as he was popularly called (cf. Luke 2:1),gradually consolidated virtual monarchic power in the imperial office,bringing the Roman Republic to a close and founding what is known as the“Principate.” Following his death in A.D. 14 each of his successors took thename “Caesar” as their imperial title. For an excellent brief summary of thepolitical and military intrigue surrounding Julius and Augustus Caesar andthe transition from the Republic to the Principate, see Koester, History,Culture and Religion of the Hellenistic Age, pp.298-307.  Kaisar is used inthe New Testament to refer to Augustus (Luke 2:1); Tiberius (Luke 3:1 – A.D.14–37), who was emperor during Jesus’ ministry; Claudius (Acts 17:7 and Acts18:2 – A.D. 41–54 ); and Nero (probably the Caesar to whom Paul appealed inActs 25:8-12, mentioned specifically in the subscript to 2 Timothy – A.D.54–68). As mentioned above, “Caesar” was a name when applied to Augustus,but a title when referring to his imperial successors. It is possible thatthe title “Caesar” is used figuratively to refer to any human ruler or tothe state in general in Jesus’ famous aphorism, “Render to Caesar the thingsthat are Caesar’s” (Mark 12:13-17; cf. Matthew 22:15-22; Luke 20:20-26).However, the context of the politically sensitive issue of paying taxes tosupport the Roman occupation makes this figurative use unlikely. (CompleteBiblical Library Greek-English Dictionary)Kaisar – Usage: Caesar(21), Caesar’s(8). 29x in 23v – Matt. 22:17; Matt.22:21; Mk. 12:14; Mk. 12:16; Mk. 12:17; Lk. 2:1; Lk. 3:1; Lk. 20:22; Lk.20:24; Lk. 20:25; Lk. 23:2; Jn. 19:12; Jn. 19:15; Acts 17:7; Acts 25:8; Acts25:10; Acts 25:11; Acts 25:12; Acts 25:21; Acts 26:32; Acts 27:24; Acts28:19; Phil. 4:22.ShalomMarciaDisciples Of Truth – Israel – USA – UKhttp://www.disciplesoftruth.net
Marcia (Proverbs 3:5-6) added a photo to Stream Photos album in Commentaries and Sermons group 6 days ago

A decree went out from Caesar Augustus – Note that this is not his actual
name but a combination of two titles. Caesar is a title like king or...
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A decree went out from Caesar Augustus – Note that this is not his actualname but a combination of two titles. Caesar is a title like king or emperorand Augustus is an adjective to describe somebody.  Augustus means August,revered, highly esteemed, highly regarded, honoured.  Augustus was given asan indication of how they honoured him. And thus Caesar Augustus refers toGaius Octavius Thurinus, (born 63 BC) who ruled Rome from 27 B.C. to A.D.14. He was known for his administrative prowess. Wikipedia says “His statusas the founder of the Roman Principatehas consolidated an enduring legacy asone of the most effective and controversial leaders in human history.”God prompts Caesar to issue a decree, an imperial edict. Indeed, Our GodReigns (notice the main word in sovereign!)MacArthur asks and answers – Who is Caesar Augustus? …This versatileand able ruler of the Roman Empire was born September 23 of 63 B.C.  Hisname when he was born was Gaius Octavius.  Later on, he became and is oftenreferred to as Octavian.  Now Gaius Octavius, born in 63 B.C., BeforeChrist had a mother named Atia.  His mother, Atia, was the daughter ofJulia. Julia was the sister of Julius Caesar.  Now this made Gaius Octaviusthe grand-nephew to Julius Caesar.  So he was born in high places.  Forwhatever reason, Julius Caesar took a tremendous affinity to this boy.  Headored little Gaius Octavius.  He lavished him with gifts and he honouredhim. In 43 B.C. Gaius Octavius had reached the age of twenty.  Julius Caesarat that point adopted him as his own son and declared him to be the heir tothe throne of the Roman Empire…One year later, Julius Caesar was murdered,and when he was murdered Gaius Octavius learned of his choice as JuliusCaesar’s heir.  At that point, he changed his name to Gaius Julius Caesar inhonour of his adopted father….Caesar was murdered by his friends, namelyBrutus.  One of his sisters married Mark Antony a very dominant figure inRoman history. So here he was, the grand-nephew of Julius Caesar, adopted asa son and heir; his sister married to Mark Antony who was a powerful person.At the death of Julius Caesar, three people reigned in Rome…There wasLepidus, Octavian, and Mark Antony, a triumvirate who ruled Rome.  It wasn’tlong until Lepidus fell out and the rule of Rome was left with Octavian andwith Mark Antony. They ruled together for a while until Mark Antony began todo things that bothered Octavian.  First thing he did was he left his wifeand his wife was the sister of Octavian.  He didn’t like that.  He left hiswife because he became infatuated with the legendary and bewitchingCleopatra, queen of Egypt, who really is legendary as to her powers ofseduction and ability to bewitch.  Well, she bewitched Mark Antonysuccessfully….Eventually, he began to show more concern for Egypt, moreconcern for the successes of Cleopatra, more concern for her personally andhis own welfare than he did for Rome. And so the irritation to Octavianbegan to escalate. The result was tremendous conflict between Mark Antonyand Octavian, which ultimately brought them to a great battle, a battle thatthe Egyptians never should have gotten involved in because it was a seabattle in which the Egyptian navy tried to fight the great Roman navy andwas soundly defeated. It was called the battle of Actium…when Octavianliterally destroyed the Egyptian fleet, the power of Mark Antony andCleopatra and became sole ruler of the Roman Empire, 31 B.C. is when thatoccurred. Both Mark Antony and Cleopatra soon after that committed suicidetogether and Octavian was left to rule. Officially then his rule ran to 14A.D. Forty-five years this remarkable man was the absolute monarch of theRoman Empire.  Great military skill, great political skill, great socialskill, he put an end to all civil wars, literally extended the Roman Empirefrom the west of Europe deep into the Middle East, as far east as the desertregion of Iraq today, vastly dominating the entire inhabited known world atthat time, at least known to those people.I will attach a Link to the whole of Luke Chapter Two when it's completed!ShalomMarciahttp://www.disciplesoftruth.net – Isreal – USA – UK
Jeremy I am really enjoying this commentary it is helping me a lot!!!! 6 days ago
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Marcia (Proverbs 3:5-6) I'm so pleased Jeremy Thanks to Jerry for asking me to share it for you into separate parts. I'm enjoying them also 6 days ago
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Marcia (Proverbs 3:5-6) added a photo to Stream Photos album in Commentaries and Sermons group 1 week ago

In those days (see the value of querying expressions of time) – Go back to Lk
1:5 “In the days of Herod, king of Judea.” Mt 2:1 says “Now after...
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In those days (see the value of querying expressions of time) – Go back to Lk1:5 “In the days of Herod, king of Judea.” Mt 2:1 says “Now after Jesus wasborn in Bethlehem of Judea in the days of Herod the king, magi from the eastarrived in Jerusalem.”So these were the days of the birth of the long-expected Messiah. God issovereign over everything, including the timing of events! You can stakeyour life on it! (See also Divine Providence).In those days – 52x in 51v in NAS – Gen. 6:4; Exod. 2:11; Deut. 17:9;Deut. 19:17; Jos. 20:6; Jdg. 17:6; Jdg. 18:1; Jdg. 19:1; Jdg. 20:27; Jdg.20:28; Jdg. 21:25; 1 Sam. 3:1; 1 Sam. 28:1; 2 Sam. 16:23; 2 Ki. 10:32; 2 Ki.15:37; 2 Ki. 20:1; 2 Chr. 32:24; Neh. 6:17; Neh. 13:15; Neh. 13:23; Est.1:2; Est. 2:21; Isa. 38:1; Jer. 3:16; Jer. 3:18; Jer. 5:18; Jer. 31:29; Jer.33:15; Jer. 33:16; Jer. 50:4; Jer. 50:20; Ezek. 38:17; Dan. 10:2; Joel 2:29;Joel 3:1; Zech. 8:6; Zech. 8:23; Matt. 3:1; Matt. 24:19; Matt. 24:38; Mk.1:9; Mk. 8:1; Mk. 13:17; Mk. 13:24; Lk. 2:1; Lk. 5:35; Lk. 9:36; Lk. 21:23;Acts 2:18; Rev. 9:6Proverbs says that “The king’s heart is like channels of water in the handof the LORD; He turns it wherever He wishes” (Pr 21:1) and so in Luke’saccount we see God moving the heart of  Augustus who, by his edict callingfor a census, sets the historical stage for the Messiah to be born inBethlehem. God through the edict caused Joseph to go from Nazareth toBethlehem in order to fulfil Micah 5:2Spurgeon – Little did any idea enter into Caesar’s head that he wasaccomplishing the purpose of God by bringing Mary to Bethlehem, at thatparticular time, so that her child might be born there. But God canaccomplish the purpose of his providence, and of his grace, in any way thathe pleases and although Caesar is not aware of all that is involved in hisaction, his decree, which he intends simply to be a means of registering hissubjects, and of filling his exchequer, is to be overruled by God for thefulfilment of the prophecy, uttered centuries before the event happened,that Christ must be born at Bethlehem. It may seem, to some of you, astrange thing that there should be an imperial edict, issued from Rome,which should have an important influence upon the place of birth of theChild; yet I do not doubt that, in God’s esteem, the whole of the greatRoman Empire was of very small account in comparison with his Son, our Lordand Saviour, Jesus Christ; and today, the thrones and dominions of themightiest monarchs are only like the small cogs of the wheels of divineprovidence where the welfare of even the least of the Lord’s people isconcerned. He reckons not events according to their apparent importance; thestandard of the sanctuary is a very different measure from that whichworldlings use. When any purpose of God is to be accomplished, all otherthings will be subordinated to it.ShalomMarciahttp://www.disciplesoftruth.net – Israel – USA – UK
Gavriella Amen! 5 days ago
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Luke 2:1 Now in those days a decree went out from Caesar Augustus, that a census be taken of all the inhabited earth.

Caesar: Lu 3:1 Ac 11:28...
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Marcia (Proverbs 3:5-6) added a photo to Stream Photos album in Commentaries and Sermons group 1 week ago

Luke gives us a great deal of information that is not found in the other Gospels. It is he alone who relates the stories of the visits of the angel... Show more

Luke gives us a great deal of information that is not found in the other Gospels. It is he alone who relates the stories of the visits of the angel Gabriel to Zacharias and to Mary. No one else tells us of the song of Mary, and the prophecy of Zacharias. The birth of Christ in a stable is recorded only here, as also the angel’s announcement to the shepherds. The presentation of the Child Jesus in the temple at Jerusalem, and the welcome given by Anna and Simeon, also are mentioned only here. The first meeting in Nazareth, as recorded in chapter four; the great draught of fishes; the interview with the woman of the city in the house of Simon the Pharisee, as found in chapter seven; the beautiful incident of Mary at the feet of Jesus; and the mission of the seventy (Luke 10) are found only here. Much of the material of chapters eleven to eighteen inclusive is told only by Luke, as also the story of Zaccheus. It is he alone who mentions the coming of the angel to our Savior to strengthen Him in His Gethsemane agony. And had it not been for Luke, we would never have known of the penitent thief, nor of the visit of our risen Lord with the two disciples on the way to and in their home at Emmaus.Then when we think of the parables, it is striking to note how many are only related in this Gospel. The story of the Good Samaritan, the rich fool, the barren fig-tree, the great supper (not to be confounded with the marriage of the king’s son as given in Matthew) the lost coin, the prodigal son, the unjust steward, the story of Dives and Lazarus, the unjust judge and the widow, the Pharisee and the publican, and the parable of the pounds, are all given by Luke. The last-mentioned, while similar to the parable of the talents, is, nevertheless, quite a different story.How much then we would be bereaved of, if Luke had not been moved by the Spirit of God to search out so many things that no other inspired writer has recorded. There is nothing redundant here. All is of great importance and cannot be overestimated, so far as its value to the Church of God is concerned, and also its importance in presenting the gospel of the grace of God in its manifold aspects…1. Six miracles peculiar to Luke. (1) The draught of fishes, Lk 5:4-11. (2) The raising of the widow’s son, Lk 7:11- 18. (3) The woman with the spirit of infirmity, Lk 13:11-17. (4) The man with the dropsy, Lk 14:1-6. (5) The ten lepers, Lk 17:11-19. (6) The healing of Malchus’ ear. Lk 22:50-51. 2. Eleven parables, peculiar to Luke. (1) The two debtors, Lk 7:41-43. (2) The good Samaritan, Lk 10:25-37. (3) The importunate friend, Lk 11:5-8. (4) The rich fool, Lk 12:16-19. (5) The barren fig-tree, Lk 13:6-9. (6) The lost piece of silver, Lk 15:8-10. (7) The prodigal son, Lk 15:11-32. (8) The unjust steward, Lk 16:1-13. (9) The rich man and Lazarus, Lk 18:19-31. (10) The unjust judge, Lk 18:1-8. (11) The Pharisee and publican, Lk 18:9-14. 3. Some other passages mainly peculiar to Luke. (1) Luke 1:1-2:52 and Lk 9:51- 18:14 are mainly peculiar to Luke. (2) John the Baptist’s answer to the people. Lk 3:10-14. (3) The conversation with Moses and Elias, Lk 9:30- 31. (4) The weeping over Jerusalem, Lk 19:41-44. (5) The bloody sweat, Lk 22:44. (6) The sending of Jesus to Herod, Lk 23:7-12. (7) The address to the daughters of Jerusalem, 23:27-31. (8) “Father forgive them”, 23:34. (9) The penitent robber, 23:40-43. (10) The disciples at Emmaus, 24:13-31; (11) Particulars about the ascension. 24:50-53. 4. The following words and phrases should be studied, making a list of the references where each occurs and a study of each passage in which they occur with a view of getting Luke’s conception of the term. (1) The “son of man” (23 times). (2) The “son of God” (7 times). (3) The “kingdom of God” (32 times). (4) References to law, lawyer, lawful (18 times). (5) Publican (11 times). (6) Sinner and sinners (16 times).Mr. Stroud estimates that 59 percent of Luke is peculiar to himself and Mr. Weiss figures that 541 have no incidences in the other gospels. (H.A. Ironside Expository Commentary)ShalomMarciahttp://www.disciplesoftruth.net – Isreal – USA – UK
Marcia (Proverbs 3:5-6) added a photo to Stream Photos album in Commentaries and Sermons group 2 weeks ago

It is as if Luke said to himself, ‘I am writing the greatest story in the world and nothing but the best is good enough for it.’ Some of the ancient... Show more

It is as if Luke said to himself, ‘I am writing the greatest story in the world and nothing but the best is good enough for it.’ Some of the ancient manuscripts are very beautiful productions, written in silver ink on purple vellum; and often the scribe, when he came to the name of God or of Jesus, wrote it in gold (Ed: O that we too might handle the precious Word of God with such a sense of awe and reverence! May this lofty objective transform our daily reading from mundane to majestic by the power of the Spirit. Amen). The story is told of an old workman who, every Friday night, took the newest and shiniest coins out of his pay packet for Sunday’s offering in church. The historian, the scribe and the workman were all filled with the same idea—only the best is good enough for Jesus. They always gave their utmost for the highest. (Ed: Also the title of Oswald Chambers famous devotional writing!) (2) It is most significant that Luke was not satisfied with anyone else’s story of Christ. He must have his own. Real religion is never a second hand thing. It is a personal discovery.Professor Arthur Gossip of Trinity College, Glasgow, used to say that the four gospels were important, but beyond them all came the gospel of personal experience. Luke had to rediscover Jesus Christ for himself (Ed: But it is all based on careful, exacting scholarship, not speculation or hypotheses!) (3) There is no passage of the Bible which sheds such a floodlight on the doctrine of the inspiration of Scripture. No one would deny that the Gospel of Luke is an inspired document; and yet Luke begins by affirming that it is the product of the most careful historical research. God’s inspiration does not come to those who sit with folded hands and lazy minds and only wait, but to those who think and seek and search (Ed: Beloved this same principle applies to our reading of the Word of God. We are unlikely to be led by our Teacher the Spirit into significant depth of understanding of the inspired Word if our only objective is to check off my daily “read through the Bible in a year” assignment! One verse paused over and pondered on, is of far more value to our soul than one chapter passes over quickly and mechanically!). True inspiration comes when the searching mind joins with the revealing Spirit of God. The word of God is given, but it is given to those who search for it.End Of Introduction, Luke Chapter One Commentary beginsA few Insights on the Gospel of Luke from H A Ironside – Luke dwells much on the prayer-life of Jesus Christ, and prayer, of course, is connected with His Manhood. Jesus never makes a move but He looks first to His Father in heaven. We see Him praying, praying, praying, as every important occasion arises. In this Gospel, we also see frequently the Lord Jesus Christ as a guest in the homes of various people. He sat with them and ate with them, and talked over their problems. No other Gospel presents Christ going out to dinner so often as Luke does. Jesus shares their joys and sorrows and partakes of the good things that are presented to Him. When you meet a man at the dinner-table you find out what he really is. I had read forty or fifty biographies of Martin Luther, but he always seemed to be a figure on a pedestal until I read “Luther’s Table Talks.” Then I felt that he and I were friends. I felt that I knew the man as I could not have known him otherwise. So these accounts of Christ at the dinner-table give us an understanding of His Manhood, which we would not get in any other way….ShalomMarciahttp://www.disciplesoftruth.net – Isreal – USA – UK
Marcia (Proverbs 3:5-6) added a photo to Stream Photos album in Commentaries and Sermons group 2 weeks ago

Morris – Others had written about Christ and His teachings before Luke did (Luke 1:1), including Matthew and Mark, both of whom had known Christ... Show more

Morris – Others had written about Christ and His teachings before Luke did (Luke 1:1), including Matthew and Mark, both of whom had known Christ personally, a privilege probably not shared by Luke. Nevertheless, Luke’s long association with the Apostle Paul and others who had known the Lord (Luke 1:2), together with his obvious ability in investigation and research, enabled him to write down an accurate account of his own. Many think that Luke may have drawn on Mark’s account, as well as Matthew’s or even some other hypothetical written source supposedly used by all of them (the so-called “Q-document,” or some such record). Even if such a document really existed (which is very doubtful), it was not divinely inspired like those of Matthew, Mark and Luke, but simply a human record of events, from which they could draw in their research, as led by the Holy Spirit. This latter presumption is supported by Luke’s claim that he had “perfect understanding of all things from above” (the latter being a legitimate alternative to “the very first”).J C Ryle – Christianity is a religion built upon facts. Let us never lose sight of this. It came before mankind at first in this shape. The first preachers did not go up and down the world, proclaiming an elaborate, artificial system of abstruse doctrines and deep principles. They made it their first business to tell men great plain facts. They went about telling a sin-laden world, that the Son of God had come down to earth, and lived for us, and died for us, and risen again. The Gospel, at its first publication, was far more simple than many make it now.It was neither more nor less than the history of Christ. While Matthew speaks especially to the Jews, Luke speaks, especially to the Gentiles. Godet, wrote that if Matthew is “A treatise on the right of Jesus to the Messianic sovereignty of Israel,” then Luke is “A treatise on the right of the heathen to share in the Messianic kingdom founded by Jesus.”William Barclay – LUKE’S introduction is unique in the first three gospels because it is the only place where the author steps out upon the stage and uses the pronoun ‘I’. There are three things to note in this passage. (1) It is the best bit of Greek in the New Testament. Luke uses here the very form of introduction which the great Greek historians all used. Herodotus begins, ‘These are the researches of Herodotus of Halicarnassus.’ A much later historian, Dionysius of Halicarnassus, tells us at the beginning of his history, ‘Before beginning to write I gathered information, partly from the lips of the most learned men with whom I came into contact, and partly from histories written by Romans of whom they spoke with praise.’ So Luke, as he began his story in the most sonorous (Ed: full, loud, and deep) Greek, followed the highest models he could find.ShalomMarciaDisciples of Truth ~ Israel - USA - UKwww.disciplesoftruth.net

𝐓𝐡𝐞 𝐭𝐡𝐢𝐧𝐠𝐬 𝐚𝐜𝐜𝐨𝐦𝐩𝐥𝐢𝐬𝐡𝐞𝐝 𝐚𝐦𝐨𝐧𝐠 𝐮𝐬 – 𝐓𝐡𝐞 𝐍𝐀𝐒 𝐫𝐞𝐧𝐝𝐞𝐫𝐢𝐧𝐠 𝐝𝐨𝐞𝐬 𝐡𝐚𝐯𝐞 𝐚 𝐦𝐚𝐫𝐠𝐢𝐧𝐚𝐥 𝐧𝐨𝐭𝐞 = “𝐨𝐧 𝐰𝐡𝐢𝐜𝐡 𝐭𝐡𝐞𝐫𝐞 𝐢𝐬 𝐟𝐮𝐥𝐥 𝐜𝐨𝐧𝐯𝐢𝐜𝐭𝐢𝐨𝐧.” 𝐓𝐡𝐢𝐬 𝐫𝐞𝐟𝐥𝐞𝐜𝐭 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐟𝐚𝐜𝐭 𝐭𝐡𝐚𝐭 𝐨𝐧𝐞... Show more

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Marcia (Proverbs 3:5-6) added a photo to Stream Photos album in Commentaries and Sermons group 2 weeks ago

Part Four Introduction to the Book Of Luke

John MacArthur - It is important to note that Luke was not critical of those who had undertaken (a term often...
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Part Four Introduction to the Book Of LukeJohn MacArthur - It is important to note that Luke was not critical of those who had undertaken (a term often used in connection with literary endeavours) to compile an account (a phrase often used to refer to historical writing) of Jesus’ life and ministry. He did not pen his gospel as a corrective to those accounts, but because God prompted him to write a comprehensive narrative of the life of Christ and the spread of His salvation gospel. Luke’s reason for referring to his sources was twofold. First, it establishes his history as a legitimate, reliable account. He was a careful historian who used credible methods of research and writing, and based his content on the firsthand accounts of eyewitnesses. Second, Luke’s use of those sources places his gospel squarely in the Orthodox tradition. His volume was not a bizarre, different, heretical gospel. Luke’s account was consistent with the teaching of the apostles (cf. Acts 2:42) and with those of eyewitnesses and especially the other Spirit-inspired gospel writers (cf. John 20:30 31; 21:24–25). (Luke Commentary) To compile ("to set forth in order" = KJV) (anatassomai from anti = + tasso = to put in order, to arrange) literally means to arrange in a row, to draw up again in order, to compose, to arrange in a series "a narrative that the sequence of events may be evident." It is used by Plutarch in classic Greek to denote going regularly through a thing again and so to rehearse it. Here Luke uses it to arrange in proper order, that is, to arrange afresh so as to show the sequence of events. Luke's Gospel, in fact, is the most chronologically arranged of all 4 Gospels.A T Robertson on anatassomai - This verb anataxasthai has been found only in Plutarch’s Moral. 968 CD about an elephant “rehearsing” by moonlight certain tricks it had been taught (Moulton and Milligan, Vocabulary). That was from memory going regularly through the thing again. But the idea in the word is plain enough. The word is composed of tassō, a common verb for arranging things in proper order and ana, again. Luke means to say that those before him had made attempts to rehearse in orderly fashion various matters about Christ. “The expression points to a connected series of narratives in some order (taxis), topical or chronological rather than to isolated narratives” (Bruce). “They had produced something more than mere notes or anecdotes” (Plummer) Account (diegesis from diá = through or an intensifier + hēgéomai = to lead) is a narrative or message that tells the details of an act or course of events in an orderly sequence. BDAG says diegesis is "an orderly description of facts, events, actions, or words." It is used of a historical report in classic Greek. It is a discourse consisting of an orderly exposition or narration. NET Note explains that "This is sometimes translated "narrative," but the term itself can refer to an oral or written account. It is the verb "undertaken" (epicheireo) which suggests a written account, since it literally is "to set one's hand" to something." It indicates a narration of a verified and well-witnessed report. NET Note on diegesis - This is sometimes translated "narrative," but the term itself can refer to an oral or written account. It is the verb "undertaken" which suggests a written account, since it literally is "to set one's hand" to something (BDAG 386 s.v. evpiceire, w). "Narrative" is too specific, denoting a particular genre of work for the accounts that existed in the earlier tradition. Not all of that material would have been narrative. Vincent on diegesis - Only here in New Testament. From διά, through, and ἡγέομαι, to lead the way. Hence something which leads the reader through the mass of facts: a narrative, as A. V., with the accompanying idea of thoroughness. Note the singular number. Many took in hand to draw up, not narratives, but a narrative, embracing the whole of the evangelic matter. The word was particularly applied to a medical treatise. Galen (a prominent Greek physician) applies it at least seventy-three times to the writings of Hippocrates (also a Greek physician).A T Robertson on diegesis - [Diēgēsis] means leading or carrying a thing through, not a mere incident. This is the only NT use of diegesis. There are 2 uses in the non-apocryphal Septuagint - Judges 5:14, Hab 2:6. Gilbrant - In classical Greek literature (diegesis) was used in a speech by Aristotle, for example, where it means “the statement of a case” (Liddell-Scott). Similarly, Luke described the many who had undertaken to compile a “narrative” (RSV); “declaration” (KJV); “account” (NIV), of the things concerning Jesus.pdf Full Commentary at the top of the screenShalom
Marcia (Proverbs 3:5-6) added a photo to Stream Photos album in Commentaries and Sermons group 2 weeks ago

Part Three Luke Introduction

Here is Pastor Cole's broad outline of Luke

1. Introduction: Purpose for writing (Lk 1:1-4).
2. The Advent of the Son of...
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Part Three Luke IntroductionHere is Pastor Cole's broad outline of Luke1. Introduction: Purpose for writing (Lk 1:1-4).2. The Advent of the Son of Man (Lk 1:5-4:13).3. The Ministry of the Son of Man: Galilee (Lk 4:14-9:50).4. The Rejection of the Son of Man: Toward Jerusalem (Lk 9:51-19:27).A. Mounting opposition (Lk 9:51-11:54).B. Instructions in view of the opposition (Lk 12:1-19:27).5. The Suffering of the Son of Man (Lk 19:28-23:56).6. The Triumph of the Son of Man (Lk 24:1-53).In as much (epeideper from epeidḗ = since, and per = truly) is a conjunction since indeed, considering that, whereas, usually referring to a fact already known. Friberg adds that it is "a causal conjunction with reference to a well-known fact." BDAG adds it is an "intensified form of epeide, a marker of cause or reason." This is the only use in the NT. Dr Luke uses epeideper to introduce the reason for his Gospel account. Bock on epeideper - The conditional term epeidēper, (inasmuch as) is usually causally related to the action of the main clause: “since many have undertaken” (BDF §456.3). Those accounts laid the groundwork for why Luke writes. Ancient writers loved to show that what they were doing had precedents." (Ibid)A triple compound particle (“since,” “truly,” “indeed”) expressing cause with reference to a fact already well known. (Cleon Rogers) Vincent - "Only here in New Testament. A compound conjunction: epei, since, de, as is well known, and per, giving the sense of certainty." Many - This refers to both to previous written and/or oral testimonies. A T Robertson on many - How many no one knows, but certainly more than two or three. We know that Luke used the Logia of Jesus written by Matthew in Aramaic (Papias) and Mark’s Gospel. Undoubtedly he had other written sources.Undertaken ("have taken in hand" - KJV)(epicheireo from epi = upon, in + cheir = hand) means to take in hand, to put the hand to, to set one's hand to some task, to endeavor to perform a task (in this case to write the Gospel account), to try, to undertake. To take in hand, undertake, attempt, whether effective or not. The only uses are by Luke (Lk 1:1, Acts 9:29 = "attempting to put him to death," Acts 19:13 = "attempted to name over those who had the evil spirits the name of the Lord Jesus.)Vincent on epicheireo - The word carries the sense of a difficult undertaking (see Acts 19:13), and implies that previous attempts have not been successful. It occurs frequently in medical language. Hippocrates begins one of his medical treatises very much as Luke begins his gospel. “As many as have taken in hand (ἐπεχείρησαν) to speak or to write concerning the healing art.”The pdf full commentary is at the top of page.
Marcia (Proverbs 3:5-6) added a photo to Stream Photos album in Commentaries and Sermons group 2 weeks ago

Part Two Luke Introduction.

The preface to the Gospel (Lk 1:1-4)
The sources for the Gospel (Lk 1:1-2)
The research for the Gospel (Lk 1:3)
The...
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Part Two Luke Introduction.The preface to the Gospel (Lk 1:1-4)The sources for the Gospel (Lk 1:1-2)The research for the Gospel (Lk 1:3)The purpose for the Gospel (Lk 1:4)J C Ryle - St. Luke's Gospel contains many precious things which are not recorded in the other three Gospels. For example, the histories of Zechariah and Elizabeth, the angel's announcement to the Virgin Mary, and, in general terms, the first two chapters of his Gospel. Only St. Luke records the conversions of Zacchaeus and the penitent thief, the walk to Emmaus, and the famous parables of the Pharisee and the Tax Collector, the Rich Man and Lazarus, and the Lost Son. These are parts of Scripture for which every well-instructed Christian feels peculiarly thankful. And for these we are indebted to the Gospel of St. Luke. (Expository Thoughts Luke 1).Darrell Bock - Luke begins his work as other ancient writers do, with a preface. The entire paragraph is one long Greek sentence. Luke explains his connection to the past and his desire to give his readers assurance about the instruction they have received. Luke discusses in Luke 1:1 the tradition he inherited. Then he traces in Luke 1:2the origin of that tradition in eyewitnesses and servants who preach the Word. As the main clause, Luke 1:3 discusses how Luke wrote his account. The last verse reveals Luke’s purpose. He desires to give his reader, Theophilus, assurance about the events surrounding Jesus. (Baker Exegetical Commentary).Steven Cole introduces his sermon series on Luke with these thoughts - Luke has a number of distinctive features. He devotes more space to the birth and infancy of Jesus than any other gospel. He alone mentions the incident from Jesus’ youth, when He was left behind at the Temple. On the other end of Jesus’ life, Luke alone mentions the ascension and, in his companion volume (Acts) traces the history of Jesus’ followers beyond that momentous event. Luke clearly has a universal emphasis, showing that the gospel is for every class, race, and nation. The angels tell the shepherds that the news of the Savior who has been born is “good news of a great joy which shall be for all the people” (Lk 2:10). The aged Simeon prophesies that this Child is God’s salvation which He has prepared in the presence of all peoples, “a light of revelation to the Gentiles” (Lk 2:32). As John the Baptist preaches, Luke alone (of the synoptics) cites Isaiah, that “all flesh shall see the salvation of God” (Lk 3:6). When our Lord begins His ministry at Nazareth, He creates animosity by pointing out that Elijah was sent to a Gentile widow in Sidon and that the Gentile Naaman the leper was cleansed (Lk 4:25-27). Luke closes with Jesus’ commission that “repentance for forgiveness of sins should be proclaimed in His name to all the nations” (Lk 24:47). Not just Gentiles, but sinners of every stripe are the focus of Luke’s gospel. He uses the word “sinners” 16 times, more than Matthew (5), Mark (5), and John (4) combined....Luke is the only synoptic gospel to call Jesus “Savior” (Lk 2:11). He alone uses the word salvation (6 times) and ten times he uses the word for preaching the good news, which is only used once in the other gospels. Luke alone of the three uses the word grace (8 times) and Luke is the only Gospel writer to use the words “redemption” and “redeem” (J. Sidlow Baxter, Explore the Book [Zondervan], 5:254). The theme verse of Luke occurs in the context of the salvation of the despised tax  collector, Zaccheus, where Jesus explains His mission: “For the Son of Man has come to seek and to save that which was lost” (Lk 19:10).....Luke has been called the Gospel of Prayer because of his emphasis, not only on our need to pray, but also on Jesus’ prayer life. Nine times Luke tells of prayers that Jesus offered in the crises of His life, and seven of these are unique to Luke (Scroggie, p. 370). It has also been called the Gospel of the Holy Spirit, who is named more in Luke than in Matthew and Mark together, and even more than in John (Baxter, p. 246). There is a marked emphasis on Jesus’ dependence on the Spirit. Thus Luke shows us Jesus as the Savior who was fully human, but who triumphed as man through dependence on prayer and the Holy Spirit. (Luke 1:1-4).The pdf full commentary is at the top of page.Shalom
Abijah Amen. 2 weeks ago
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Marcia (Proverbs 3:5-6) added a photo to Stream Photos album in Commentaries and Sermons group 2 weeks ago

Introduction - In depth verse by verse analysis with numerous word studies, cross-references, and quotations from conservative resources.

NOTE: This...
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Introduction -  In depth verse by verse analysis with numerous word studies, cross-references, and quotations from conservative resources.NOTE: This Verse by Verse Commentary page is part of an ongoing project to add notes to each verse of the Bible. Therefore many verses do not yet have notes, but if the Lord tarries and gives me breath, additions will follow in the future. The goal is to edify and equip you for the work of service (Eph 4:12-13) that the Lord God might be glorified in your life and in His Church. Amen (Isa 61:3b, Mt 5:16).First image- From Jensen's Survey of the NT by permission Luke 1:1 In as much as many have undertaken to compile an account of the things accomplishedamong us, ▪ those. John 20:31. Ac. 1:1–3. 1 Ti. 3:16. 2 Pe. 1:16–19.AMPLIFIED SINCE [as is well known] many have undertaken to put in order and draw up a [thorough] narrative of the surely established deeds which have beenaccomplished and fulfilled in and among us, Barclay Since many have set their hands to the task of drawing up an account of the events which were completed amongst us, CSB Many have undertaken to compile a narrative about the events that have been fulfilled among us, ESV Inasmuch as many have undertaken to compile a narrative of the things that have been accomplished among us, GWN Many have attempted to write about what had taken place among us.KJV Forasmuch as many have taken in hand to set forth in order a declaration of those thingswhich are most surely believed among us,NET Now many have undertaken to compile an account of the things that have beenfulfilled among us,NAB Since many have undertaken to compile a narrative of the events that have been fulfilledamong us,NIV Many have undertaken to draw up an account of the things that have been fulfilled amongus,NLT Many people have set out to write accounts about the events that have been fulfilledamong us.NJB Seeing that many others have undertaken to draw up accounts of the events that havereached their fulfilment among us,Wuest - Since it is well known and a fact of importance that many have undertaken to drawup in its historical sequence a narrative of events concerning which there has been a widediffusion of knowledge among us,YLT Seeing that many did take in hand to set in order a narration of the matters that havebeen fully assured among us,Luke begins a very long sentence that continues through Luke 1:4.John Hannah has this outline.There is a pdf at the top of the screen with this whole study.Shalom
Jessica I am very excited about this group. I am looking forward to not only the study itself. But the in-depth of the words! GREAT JOB so far! 2 weeks ago
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Tadashi Me too Jessica! 2 weeks ago
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